Paprika Spice & It's Varietes

Paprika spice is high in vitamin A & C as well as bioflavonoids, antioxidants, and carotenes.

It can help to relieve sore throats, runny nose, congestion, and headaches that often accompany the common cold.

Paprika is in the same capsicum family as chili and bell peppers, but is unique in flavor and can range from very sweet to extremely hot. The capsicum has analgesic or pain-relieving properties.

Paprika has up to nine times the amount of vitamin C than tomatoes. This high vitamin C content helps to strengthen the immune system, protect against cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and stroke, and help the body absorb and assimilate iron.

Paprika has the ability to aid in digestion and help to improve circulation. Paprika has even been known to help normalize blood pressure and feed the cell structure of the arteries, veins, and capillaries so they regain elasticity. It can stimulate the body and be a great internal warmer in cold weather.

Paprika has antibacterial properties that can protect one from salmonella and E.coli in the digestive tract. Paprika also has the ability to help the body fight common infections.

Paprika is an excellent addition to any vegetable dish including soups, fresh salsa, guacamole, roasted vegetables, potatoes, and cauliflower. A pinch can even be added to your morning smoothie or fruit salad for a spicy and immune boosting kick.
Paprika is far more than a dusting of color on top of potato salads and deviled eggs. Fresh paprika has the full flavor of the peppers it was ground from. Originating, like all chili peppers, in the Americas, paprika peppers are now strongly associated with Hungarian cuisine. Paprika can range in flavor from mild and sweet to fiery hot, and is used heavily in Eastern European cooking.

Like most spices, paprika has different varieties or grades. But it surpasses others in terms of just how many of those varieties are easily obtainable. Not all paprika is spicy. Some has all the heat of a bell pepper. 

You can pick your preferred paprika to add in your daily meals
  

Paprika is nothing more than dried and finely ground capsicums, and different regions grow peppers with different heat. Paprika marked as "sweet" will have almost no heat at all. It has the warm flavor of ripe peppers and sunshine, as well as a complimentary bitterness. "Semi-sweet" or "semi-hot" varieties still are relatively mild but carry some kick, like a cross between red bell pepper and cayenne. "Hot varieties" carry significant heat, though it's still much more nuanced and flavorful than red pepper flakes or cayenne. If you want to incorporate more chiles into your food but can't handle much heat, the bitter and sweet flavors and aromas of paprika are for you.

The recent darling of food fanatics everywhere has been Spanish smoked paprika, or pimentón. Like all paprika, you can find pimentón with varying degrees of heat: dulce is mild, agridulce is semi-hot, and picante is the hot stuff, but again more focus on flavor than heat.

If you're thinking of purchasing new paprika, I'd recommend semi-sweet Hungarian,which has a balanced, bittersweet flavor, and hot pimentón for more complex kick. Those two should cover most of your paprika needs. But why stop there? With a spice as versatile as paprika there's no reason to hold back.

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